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Spiros Hadjidjanos

Press release


Spiros Hadjidjanos

For his latest exhibition at the Future Gallery, Spiros Hadjidjanos explores the relationship between the collective acceleration of the cultural and technological evolutions. His experience of this shift in relation to his own trajectory and memory drives the investigation. Drawing from a material that dates back to his childhood, Hadjidjanos examines dialectical relationships with material juxtapositions and how images are physically manifested to present his findings.

Height map II and Height map III are 3D inkjet prints on high-density foam. For the depicted landscapes in both works, Hadjidjanos used scanned photographs originally from the archive of Swiss photographer Frédéric Boissonnas in Geneva. The three-dimensional color print and the form of the sculptures are based on the light and shadows of the original photographs.

The work Euphorbia Acanthothamnos derives from Hadjidjanos’ long-term interest in the technological network topology. Hadjidjanos has transported the plant with the same name – a native to the Mediterranean and the Attica peninsula – from Athens to Berlin. Its structure, which will change throughout the course of the exhibition, demonstrates a very clear form of a hierarchical network. The plant forms a pair with a raw volume of Pentelic marble, its natural substrate. Here, marble, the material of sculpture par excellence, is subordinated to the ever-changing plant.

Two-dimensional works of carbon fiber depict segments of the Euphorbia Acanthothamnos plant, magnified by an electron microscope. The 3D models of the magnified plant look like a node in a biotechnological network. Without full control of the final outcome, the digital prints on carbon fiber have been physically manipulated through the process of resin infusion before taking their crystallized form.

Deep Network consists of three powerful computers running neural networks that are constantly being trained on the calculation and production of novel images. Although they run the same process over and over, by using two photographs of Frederic Boissonnas as input, they generate images that are never identical. Their uncanny training is rendered visible as light signals which are manifested in physical space through extended fiber optic light conductors and therefore spawn a corporeal experience.

Spiros Hadjidjanos *1978 Athens, Greece, lives and works in Berlin.